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Thursday, 16 May 2019
 
In memoriam: Associate Professor Anita Rønne, University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Law
Tuesday, 08 January 2019

flower memorialIt is with tremendous sadness that we mourn the death of Associate Professor Anita Rønne who died on 13th December after a short illness.

Anita was employed at the Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen from 1985 and was a highly respected and well liked member of the IUCN Academy. Her expertise in Energy law, Climate Change Law and International Environmental Law meant that her work intersected with the work of many of our members and she was a good friend and colleague to many more.

Anita had many collaborators in Denmark and more widely and participated in numerous international research collaborations on both conferences and publications. She was a prolific researcher including classics such as “Energy Law in Europe – National, EU and International Regulation” of which she was a co-editor.

 

Anita’s innovative approach to environmental law research often led the field. One of her last contributions explores smart technology and regulation. Fortunately, Anita lived to see her co-edited book on this topic "Ret SMART. Om smart teknologi og regulering” (About smart technology and regulation) published in October.

Anita was also an innovative teacher. She was, for example, one of the initiators of Copenhagen’s International Energy Law and Sustainability Masters and also taught on their Climate Change Law Masters.

We remember Anita as a very generous person, always willing to cooperate with others, and encouraging of early career academics. She will be deeply missed by our community.

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2018 Environmental Law Education Awards
Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Distinguished Education Award Senior Faculty

Catherine Iorns Magallanes

Catherine Iorns Magallanes

Catherine Iorns is a Reader in the School of Law at Victoria University of Wellington, Aotearoa New Zealand. She has more than 25 years' experience teaching a range of subjects, including statutory interpretation, indigenous rights, and international law, in addition to a range of environmental law courses. Catherine has focused on pedagogy from the beginning of her career, with presentations and papers on teaching international law, for example, in the 1990s. This has continued today, with her recently undertaking a Higher Education Learning and Teaching course, writing on changing ideas of effective innovations in environmental law teaching.

Catherine is also a well-respected researcher in both indigenous rights and environmental law. Her research achievements include ‘A’ rankings for her written outputs, two writing awards for environmental law papers from the New Zealand Resource Management Law Association, and citations in decisions by the New Zealand EPA. She has recently held external research contracts in relation to precaution and ecosystem-based management, and a current National Science Challenge contract in relation to climate adaptation.

Catherine is also a national Board member of Amnesty International Aotearoa New Zealand, and the Academic Advisor to the New Zealand Council of Legal Education. She is a member of the International Law Association Committee on the Implementation of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, a member of the IUCN World Commission on Environmental Law, and a member of the Bioethics Panel for the New Zealand Biological Heritage National Science Challenge. 

Distinguished Education Award Emerging Faculty

Estair Van Wagner

Estair Van Wagner

Estair Van Wagner is an assistant professor at Osgoode Hall Law School where she is a co-director of the Environmental Justice and Sustainability Clinic. Her research and teaching interests are in the areas of property, land use planning, and natural resource law. Estair has developed a unique place-based approach to legal education, building on her relational approach to research about land use conflicts and people-place relations. She is a member of the organizing committee for Osgoode’s Anishinaabe law camp, developed in partnership with the Chippewas of Nawash First Nation.

Prior to joining Osgoode, Estair was a lecturer at the Victoria University of Wellington Faculty of Law, where... Read More...

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2018 Scholarship Awards
Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Distinguished Scholarship Award, Senior Faculty

Sheila R. Foster

Sheila Foster

Sheila R. Foster is a joint Professor of Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University. Prior to joining Georgetown, she was a University Professor and the Albert A. Walsh Professor of Real Estate, Land Use and Property Law at Fordham University. She also co-directed the Fordham Urban Law Center and was a founder of the Fordham University Urban Consortium. Prior to joining Fordham, she was a Professor of Law at the Rutgers University in Camden, New Jersey.

Professor Foster is the author of numerous publications on environmental law, and is one of the country’s leading scholars on environmental justice. She is co-author of the classic text From the Ground Up: Environmental Racism and the Environmental Justice Movement (NYU Press 2001) (with Luke Cole) and co-editor of The Law of Environmental Justice: Theories and Procedures to Address Disproportionate Risks (American Bar Association 2009) (with Michael Gerrard).    Over the last two decades, she has worked with government agencies, non-government organizations, scholars, and policymakers to reform environmental and land use policies and practices consistent with the principles of environmental justice. Her most recent work explores city growth and governance through the lens of the “commons,” bringing the analytical lens of her environmental law and policy to the city and the management of urban resources. Her latest article, The City as a Commons, is published in the Yale Law and Policy Review (with Christian Iaione) and is the basis of a forthcoming book for MIT Press.

Professor Foster has been involved on many levels with environmental and urban policy. Currently she sits on the New York City Panel on Climate Change (and co-chairs one of its working groups on community-based equitable adaptation), is chair of the advisory committee of the Global Parliament of Mayors, and an advisory board member of the Marron Institute for Urban Management at NYU.

Distinguished Scholarship Award, Emerging Faculty

Saiful Karim

Saiful Karim

Associate Professor (Dr) Saiful Karim is the Director (International) of the School of Law at the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, Australia. Dr Karim has held Visiting Faculty position at Sydney University and a consultant at the University of the South Pacific and a visiting research fellow at the National University of Singapore. Dr. Karim has published extensively in the fields of public international law and environmental law and has presented research papers in many conferences and workshops organised by various academic... Read More...

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2017 Scholarship Awards
Wednesday, 27 September 2017

2017 Senior Scholarship Award

Jonathan Verschuuren

Professor of International and European Environmental Law - Tilburg Sustainability Center and Tilburg Law School
Extraordinary professor North West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa
Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellow - Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law, University of Sydney

Jonathan is a long time member of the IUCN World Commission for Environmental Law and contributor to the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law. He is currently a professor of International and European Environmental law at Tilburg Law School, Netherlands and has served as a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellow at the Australian Centre for Climate and the Environment, University of Sydney and an Extraordinary professor North West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.

Over the past 25 years, Jonathan has published more than 250 academic publications in the field of environmental law. His research comprises almost all sectors of environmental policy such as air, water, soil, waste, and biodiversity, as well as more general topics such as corporate social responsibility, the precautionary principle, transboundary cooperation, and environmental justice. He has led international book projects involving a variety of international authors, for instance: International Governance and Law. State Regulation and Non-State Law (Edward Elgar: 2008) and The Impact of Legislation. A Critical Analysis of Ex Ante Evaluation (Martinus Nijhoff/Brill: 2009).

Jonathan’s work also includes collaboration in several international research programmes, such as programme in which a South African-Dutch team of legal scholars intensively worked together on environmental governance issues in southern Africa (2005-2008); and an EU funded programme of a group of, mostly economists, from various European research institutes on the combined impact of climate change instruments, such as emissions trading and carbon taxes (2012-2015).  In 2015, Jonathan received a prestigious Marie Skolodowska Curie fellowship under the EU’s Horizon 2020 research program for a two year project aimed at developing a regulatory framework to stimulate farmers to convert to climate smart agriculture. Some of his recent publications on this topic include: J. Verschuuren, Towards a Regulatory Design for Reducing Emissions from... Read More...

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2017 Environmental Law Education Awards
Wednesday, 27 September 2017

Senior teaching award

PROFESSOR DONNA CRAIG

Donna Craig is a specialist in international, comparative and national environmental law and policy at Western Sydney University. She was one of the earliest academics to specialise in environmental law (from 1976) and has researched and taught across a wide range of environmental law areas and jurisdictions. In particular, she was a pioneer in the development of curricula and teaching in Comparative Environmental Law (focusing on the Asia and Pacific Regions), International Environmental Law, Sustainable Development Law, Corporate Environmental Law, Australian Environmental and Planning Law and Comparative Indigenous Governance Regimes. She has also made significant research and teaching contributions in aspects of Biodiversity Law (relating to recognition of knowledge and practices of Indigenous and local communities, intellectual and cultural property rights, recognition of customary laws and community based environmental management), participatory approaches to environmental decision-making, environmental impact assessment and social impact assessment.

Donna also held a Research Chair as Professor of Desert Knowledge, Charles Darwin University. She has over 40 years experience in environmental law research, legal practice, teaching and working with communities, NGO’s, environmental organisations, governments and corporations. Her research and publications emphasize the social, cultural and human rights dimensions of legislation, programs, impact assessment and sustainable development. Her climate change and water law research includes climate adaptation, resource management, capacity building and Indigenous cultural values. She also works with Indigenous and local communities developing natural resource based livelihoods and advising on national and international legal regimes. Donna served as Foundation Board Member of the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law, Regional Vice-Chair for Oceania of the IUCN Commission of Environmental Law, Regional Governor of the International Council on Environmental Law, Board Member of the Northern Territory Environmental Protection Authority and Member of Advisory Board of Greenland-based International Training Centre of Indigenous Peoples. She is currently Deputy Director of the International Centre for Ocean Governance (ICOG) at the University of Western Sydney delivering capacity building training for the Bangladesh judiciary (2017-2020).

 
Environmental Protection and Human Rights: When Friends become Foes – Conflict Management of the CJEU
Tuesday, 13 June 2017

While environmental protection and human rights are traditionally conceptualized in a synergistic fashion, the paper unveils through a series of cases how these two legitimate goals can enter into collision and, most importantly, which adjudicative topoi the CJEU employs to address these normative conflicts. The paper demonstrates how Luxembourg’s judges have developed specific hermeneutics that stand far from formal techniques of interpretation. In exploring the CJEU’s solipsistic character, its subtle process of semantic law-making embedded in its recourse to the ever-expanding ‘general interest’ to environmental protection, and its reliance on a managerial vernacular of expertise, the analysis not only elucidates changing patterns of fundamental rights adjudication but also comments on the increasingly complex legal encounter between human rights and environmental protection.


Marie-Catherine Petersmann presentation at 2016 Oslo Colloquium

Marie-Catherine Petersmann

Marie-Catherine Petersmann is a third year PhD researcher in International Law at the European University Institute (EUI) in Florence, Italy. Her research focuses on the conflicting relationship between environmental protection and human rights. More specifically, she investigates how international human rights adjudicators manage specific conflicts of norms – when environmental protection legislations negatively impact human rights – and how they reconcile these two legitimate yet sometimes colliding legal obligations. Before beginning her academic career, Marie worked for the UNHCR and for the FIDH in Geneva. Marie’s LinkedIn profile can be found here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marie-catherine-petersmann-bb9517128/

 
A Very Special Tribute to Judge Christopher Gregory Weeramantry
Wednesday, 01 March 2017

The IUCN Academy of Environmental Law announces with profound sadness the passing of Judge Christopher Gregory Weeramantry, Fellow of the IUCN Academy.

Judge Weeramantry passed away peacefully on January 5, 2017 at the age of 90 in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Following is a special tribute to Judge Weeramantry written by his former assistant, Dr. Nilupul Gunawardena Somathilaka from the Hague, The Netherlands.

Christopher Gregory Weeramantry

(1926-2017)

Each and every nation treasures a selected band of very special sons and daughters; the eminently gifted ones in any given domain of human endeavour. Christopher Gregory Weeramantry will certainly go down in history as one of the greatest sons of Sri Lanka and as a Global Citizen of the highest order.

The surname Weeramantry is spoken of with respect throughout the country: Judge Christopher Weeramantry’s father Gregory and his elder brother Lucian earned their spurs in national history, but Christopher was to reach well beyond the national compound. He made his name, and that of his beloved Sri Lanka echo worldwide. None perhaps of the eminent legal and social minds, Sri Lanka gave birth to, ever exerted such an impact on global thought as he did. For there was a personal element to it as well. By virtue of his gentle, mild personality, his irresistible charm - topped by that enchanting smile – Christopher Weeramantry, with enviable ease, laced together strings of friends and admirers worldwide.

 

Judge Weeramantry - as he was known, was gifted with a rare legal and philosophical genius, a photographic memory, an astoundable energy and a formidable drive and will-power. For all of this, he will be remembered first and foremost for his courageous stand on principle when it counted most, when he was faced with one of the greatest challenges met in the history of the International Court of Justice in The Hague, which he served with such pride and honour (1991-2000). His valiant defence, in the trenches of the law, of the unconditional ban on Nuclear Weapons will be remembered as the zenith of his moral endeavours.

Some people manage to rise to the occasion: with Judge Weeramantry, one felt he was hand-picked and groomed all his life to serve the world. Rarely, even in the impressive, century-old records of the highest judicial authority the modern world boasts as the outcome of a chequered process and at the end of a long and winding road, will one find a Judge whose in-depth humanity, truly universal outlook and inter-cultural learning shone so eminently and persuasively.

His stand in The Hague did not come by incident, though. At various critical moments in his long career Weeramantry spoke up on principle on acute political and ethical issues, be this in an... Read More...

IN MEMORIAM - Dr. Wolfgang E. Burhenne
Tuesday, 17 January 2017

By: Professor Nick Robinson

wolfgangOn January 6, 2017, a cold winter’s day in Germany, under clear blue sky with bright sunshine, Wolfgang E. Burhenne’s life ended. He died with his daughter Raphaella, and her family at home, peacefully, in Germany. His family plans a memorial celebration of the life and work of Wolfgang Burhenne in the coming months. The funeral was private, for the family.

Wolfgang Burhenne’s passion for inventing laws to protect all manner of flora and fauna is legendary. More than any other single individual, he conceived and nourished laws for nature conservation and environmental stewardship across the Earth. He was as much at home in the Alps of Austria or Bavaria as he was in East Africa or the Arabian Penisula. He loved la chasse and nourished care for wild animals. At the same time, he devoted his life to building what the world now accepts as sustainable development, helping people and nature to live together in greater harmony. He was as much at home in the hallways of the United Nations in New York or Geneva as he was in parliamentary offices across Germany, as he was in the mountains and forests.

 

In NYC at the German Mission to the UN, Dr. Wolfgang Burhenne's last visit to the UN. Pictured: Dr. Wolfgang Burhenne, Dr. Parvez Hassan, Professor Richard L. Ottinger, Professor Cymie Payne (seated), Professor Nicholas Robinson and David O'Connor, the IUCN Representative to the UN, and the IUCN's Mission staff.

Born April 27, 1924, Wolfgang Burhenne’s formal education ended with the outbreak of the Second World War. He supported resistence to the Nazi regime, and was incarcerated in a prison camp. Following the war, he developed Bavaria’s wildlife and hunting legislation and once the Federal Republic of Germany was established in 1949, he participated in preparing laws in the German Länder through serving Germany’s new Inter-Parliamentary Working Center (IPA) in Bonn. Following establishment of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature in 1948, he became a leader in IUCN at its Second Assembly of State and NGO Members in Brussels. With his IUCN contacts, in 1952 he began his life-long work for the conservation of the European Alps and also for wildlife protection in Germany.

Dr. Wolfgang Burhenne and Dr. Parvez Hassan in NYC, September 2016

In 1956, working from his offices in the Villa Salvaiati, across from the German Chancellery, he founded IUCN’s Environmental Law Centre. At his urging, IUCN had set up a committee on legislation in 1952-53, which became its Commission... Read More...

Colloquium 2017 – Stories of the World We Want and the Law as its Pathway
Tuesday, 17 January 2017

The University of Cebu cordially invites you to the 15th Annual Colloquium of the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law. This event will be held in Cebu City, Philippines, on May 29th-June 2nd, 2017. The topic for the 2016 Colloquium is "Stories of the World We Want and the Law as its Pathway".

Registration information will be available soon.

The University of Cebu and the Organizing Committee are looking forward to welcoming you in Cebu.

Professor Rose-Liza Eisma-Osorio
Chair of the organizing committee

 

Members' Events

This page provides information about events -- workshops and conferences -- that are being organized by member institutions of the IUCN Academy, in different regions of the world. These upcoming events focus on a range of issues of environmental law.

You will find a list of upcoming events, and a link to the agenda and registration material, if available, and a contact e-mail.

Payment form
Thursday, 16 May 2019
 
In memoriam: Associate Professor Anita Rønne, University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Law
Tuesday, 08 January 2019

flower memorialIt is with tremendous sadness that we mourn the death of Associate Professor Anita Rønne who died on 13th December after a short illness.

Anita was employed at the Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen from 1985 and was a highly respected and well liked member of the IUCN Academy. Her expertise in Energy law, Climate Change Law and International Environmental Law meant that her work intersected with the work of many of our members and she was a good friend and colleague to many more.

Anita had many collaborators in Denmark and more widely and participated in numerous international research collaborations on both conferences and publications. She was a prolific researcher including classics such as “Energy Law in Europe – National, EU and International Regulation” of which she was a co-editor.

 

Anita’s innovative approach to environmental law research often led the field. One of her last contributions explores smart technology and regulation. Fortunately, Anita lived to see her co-edited book on this topic "Ret SMART. Om smart teknologi og regulering” (About smart technology and regulation) published in October.

Anita was also an innovative teacher. She was, for example, one of the initiators of Copenhagen’s International Energy Law and Sustainability Masters and also taught on their Climate Change Law Masters.

We remember Anita as a very generous person, always willing to cooperate with others, and encouraging of early career academics. She will be deeply missed by our community.

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2018 Environmental Law Education Awards
Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Distinguished Education Award Senior Faculty

Catherine Iorns Magallanes

Catherine Iorns Magallanes

Catherine Iorns is a Reader in the School of Law at Victoria University of Wellington, Aotearoa New Zealand. She has more than 25 years' experience teaching a range of subjects, including statutory interpretation, indigenous rights, and international law, in addition to a range of environmental law courses. Catherine has focused on pedagogy from the beginning of her career, with presentations and papers on teaching international law, for example, in the 1990s. This has continued today, with her recently undertaking a Higher Education Learning and Teaching course, writing on changing ideas of effective innovations in environmental law teaching.

Catherine is also a well-respected researcher in both indigenous rights and environmental law. Her research achievements include ‘A’ rankings for her written outputs, two writing awards for environmental law papers from the New Zealand Resource Management Law Association, and citations in decisions by the New Zealand EPA. She has recently held external research contracts in relation to precaution and ecosystem-based management, and a current National Science Challenge contract in relation to climate adaptation.

Catherine is also a national Board member of Amnesty International Aotearoa New Zealand, and the Academic Advisor to the New Zealand Council of Legal Education. She is a member of the International Law Association Committee on the Implementation of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, a member of the IUCN World Commission on Environmental Law, and a member of the Bioethics Panel for the New Zealand Biological Heritage National Science Challenge. 

Distinguished Education Award Emerging Faculty

Estair Van Wagner

Estair Van Wagner

Estair Van Wagner is an assistant professor at Osgoode Hall Law School where she is a co-director of the Environmental Justice and Sustainability Clinic. Her research and teaching interests are in the areas of property, land use planning, and natural resource law. Estair has developed a unique place-based approach to legal education, building on her relational approach to research about land use conflicts and people-place relations. She is a member of the organizing committee for Osgoode’s Anishinaabe law camp, developed in partnership with the Chippewas of Nawash First Nation.

Prior to joining Osgoode, Estair was a lecturer at the Victoria University of Wellington Faculty of Law, where... Read More...

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2018 Scholarship Awards
Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Distinguished Scholarship Award, Senior Faculty

Sheila R. Foster

Sheila Foster

Sheila R. Foster is a joint Professor of Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University. Prior to joining Georgetown, she was a University Professor and the Albert A. Walsh Professor of Real Estate, Land Use and Property Law at Fordham University. She also co-directed the Fordham Urban Law Center and was a founder of the Fordham University Urban Consortium. Prior to joining Fordham, she was a Professor of Law at the Rutgers University in Camden, New Jersey.

Professor Foster is the author of numerous publications on environmental law, and is one of the country’s leading scholars on environmental justice. She is co-author of the classic text From the Ground Up: Environmental Racism and the Environmental Justice Movement (NYU Press 2001) (with Luke Cole) and co-editor of The Law of Environmental Justice: Theories and Procedures to Address Disproportionate Risks (American Bar Association 2009) (with Michael Gerrard).    Over the last two decades, she has worked with government agencies, non-government organizations, scholars, and policymakers to reform environmental and land use policies and practices consistent with the principles of environmental justice. Her most recent work explores city growth and governance through the lens of the “commons,” bringing the analytical lens of her environmental law and policy to the city and the management of urban resources. Her latest article, The City as a Commons, is published in the Yale Law and Policy Review (with Christian Iaione) and is the basis of a forthcoming book for MIT Press.

Professor Foster has been involved on many levels with environmental and urban policy. Currently she sits on the New York City Panel on Climate Change (and co-chairs one of its working groups on community-based equitable adaptation), is chair of the advisory committee of the Global Parliament of Mayors, and an advisory board member of the Marron Institute for Urban Management at NYU.

Distinguished Scholarship Award, Emerging Faculty

Saiful Karim

Saiful Karim

Associate Professor (Dr) Saiful Karim is the Director (International) of the School of Law at the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, Australia. Dr Karim has held Visiting Faculty position at Sydney University and a consultant at the University of the South Pacific and a visiting research fellow at the National University of Singapore. Dr. Karim has published extensively in the fields of public international law and environmental law and has presented research papers in many conferences and workshops organised by various academic... Read More...

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2017 Scholarship Awards
Wednesday, 27 September 2017

2017 Senior Scholarship Award

Jonathan Verschuuren

Professor of International and European Environmental Law - Tilburg Sustainability Center and Tilburg Law School
Extraordinary professor North West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa
Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellow - Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law, University of Sydney

Jonathan is a long time member of the IUCN World Commission for Environmental Law and contributor to the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law. He is currently a professor of International and European Environmental law at Tilburg Law School, Netherlands and has served as a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellow at the Australian Centre for Climate and the Environment, University of Sydney and an Extraordinary professor North West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.

Over the past 25 years, Jonathan has published more than 250 academic publications in the field of environmental law. His research comprises almost all sectors of environmental policy such as air, water, soil, waste, and biodiversity, as well as more general topics such as corporate social responsibility, the precautionary principle, transboundary cooperation, and environmental justice. He has led international book projects involving a variety of international authors, for instance: International Governance and Law. State Regulation and Non-State Law (Edward Elgar: 2008) and The Impact of Legislation. A Critical Analysis of Ex Ante Evaluation (Martinus Nijhoff/Brill: 2009).

Jonathan’s work also includes collaboration in several international research programmes, such as programme in which a South African-Dutch team of legal scholars intensively worked together on environmental governance issues in southern Africa (2005-2008); and an EU funded programme of a group of, mostly economists, from various European research institutes on the combined impact of climate change instruments, such as emissions trading and carbon taxes (2012-2015).  In 2015, Jonathan received a prestigious Marie Skolodowska Curie fellowship under the EU’s Horizon 2020 research program for a two year project aimed at developing a regulatory framework to stimulate farmers to convert to climate smart agriculture. Some of his recent publications on this topic include: J. Verschuuren, Towards a Regulatory Design for Reducing Emissions from... Read More...

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2017 Environmental Law Education Awards
Wednesday, 27 September 2017

Senior teaching award

PROFESSOR DONNA CRAIG

Donna Craig is a specialist in international, comparative and national environmental law and policy at Western Sydney University. She was one of the earliest academics to specialise in environmental law (from 1976) and has researched and taught across a wide range of environmental law areas and jurisdictions. In particular, she was a pioneer in the development of curricula and teaching in Comparative Environmental Law (focusing on the Asia and Pacific Regions), International Environmental Law, Sustainable Development Law, Corporate Environmental Law, Australian Environmental and Planning Law and Comparative Indigenous Governance Regimes. She has also made significant research and teaching contributions in aspects of Biodiversity Law (relating to recognition of knowledge and practices of Indigenous and local communities, intellectual and cultural property rights, recognition of customary laws and community based environmental management), participatory approaches to environmental decision-making, environmental impact assessment and social impact assessment.

Donna also held a Research Chair as Professor of Desert Knowledge, Charles Darwin University. She has over 40 years experience in environmental law research, legal practice, teaching and working with communities, NGO’s, environmental organisations, governments and corporations. Her research and publications emphasize the social, cultural and human rights dimensions of legislation, programs, impact assessment and sustainable development. Her climate change and water law research includes climate adaptation, resource management, capacity building and Indigenous cultural values. She also works with Indigenous and local communities developing natural resource based livelihoods and advising on national and international legal regimes. Donna served as Foundation Board Member of the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law, Regional Vice-Chair for Oceania of the IUCN Commission of Environmental Law, Regional Governor of the International Council on Environmental Law, Board Member of the Northern Territory Environmental Protection Authority and Member of Advisory Board of Greenland-based International Training Centre of Indigenous Peoples. She is currently Deputy Director of the International Centre for Ocean Governance (ICOG) at the University of Western Sydney delivering capacity building training for the Bangladesh judiciary (2017-2020).

 
Environmental Protection and Human Rights: When Friends become Foes – Conflict Management of the CJEU
Tuesday, 13 June 2017

While environmental protection and human rights are traditionally conceptualized in a synergistic fashion, the paper unveils through a series of cases how these two legitimate goals can enter into collision and, most importantly, which adjudicative topoi the CJEU employs to address these normative conflicts. The paper demonstrates how Luxembourg’s judges have developed specific hermeneutics that stand far from formal techniques of interpretation. In exploring the CJEU’s solipsistic character, its subtle process of semantic law-making embedded in its recourse to the ever-expanding ‘general interest’ to environmental protection, and its reliance on a managerial vernacular of expertise, the analysis not only elucidates changing patterns of fundamental rights adjudication but also comments on the increasingly complex legal encounter between human rights and environmental protection.


Marie-Catherine Petersmann presentation at 2016 Oslo Colloquium

Marie-Catherine Petersmann

Marie-Catherine Petersmann is a third year PhD researcher in International Law at the European University Institute (EUI) in Florence, Italy. Her research focuses on the conflicting relationship between environmental protection and human rights. More specifically, she investigates how international human rights adjudicators manage specific conflicts of norms – when environmental protection legislations negatively impact human rights – and how they reconcile these two legitimate yet sometimes colliding legal obligations. Before beginning her academic career, Marie worked for the UNHCR and for the FIDH in Geneva. Marie’s LinkedIn profile can be found here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marie-catherine-petersmann-bb9517128/

 
A Very Special Tribute to Judge Christopher Gregory Weeramantry
Wednesday, 01 March 2017

The IUCN Academy of Environmental Law announces with profound sadness the passing of Judge Christopher Gregory Weeramantry, Fellow of the IUCN Academy.

Judge Weeramantry passed away peacefully on January 5, 2017 at the age of 90 in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Following is a special tribute to Judge Weeramantry written by his former assistant, Dr. Nilupul Gunawardena Somathilaka from the Hague, The Netherlands.

Christopher Gregory Weeramantry

(1926-2017)

Each and every nation treasures a selected band of very special sons and daughters; the eminently gifted ones in any given domain of human endeavour. Christopher Gregory Weeramantry will certainly go down in history as one of the greatest sons of Sri Lanka and as a Global Citizen of the highest order.

The surname Weeramantry is spoken of with respect throughout the country: Judge Christopher Weeramantry’s father Gregory and his elder brother Lucian earned their spurs in national history, but Christopher was to reach well beyond the national compound. He made his name, and that of his beloved Sri Lanka echo worldwide. None perhaps of the eminent legal and social minds, Sri Lanka gave birth to, ever exerted such an impact on global thought as he did. For there was a personal element to it as well. By virtue of his gentle, mild personality, his irresistible charm - topped by that enchanting smile – Christopher Weeramantry, with enviable ease, laced together strings of friends and admirers worldwide.

 

Judge Weeramantry - as he was known, was gifted with a rare legal and philosophical genius, a photographic memory, an astoundable energy and a formidable drive and will-power. For all of this, he will be remembered first and foremost for his courageous stand on principle when it counted most, when he was faced with one of the greatest challenges met in the history of the International Court of Justice in The Hague, which he served with such pride and honour (1991-2000). His valiant defence, in the trenches of the law, of the unconditional ban on Nuclear Weapons will be remembered as the zenith of his moral endeavours.

Some people manage to rise to the occasion: with Judge Weeramantry, one felt he was hand-picked and groomed all his life to serve the world. Rarely, even in the impressive, century-old records of the highest judicial authority the modern world boasts as the outcome of a chequered process and at the end of a long and winding road, will one find a Judge whose in-depth humanity, truly universal outlook and inter-cultural learning shone so eminently and persuasively.

His stand in The Hague did not come by incident, though. At various critical moments in his long career Weeramantry spoke up on principle on acute political and ethical issues, be this in an... Read More...

IN MEMORIAM - Dr. Wolfgang E. Burhenne
Tuesday, 17 January 2017

By: Professor Nick Robinson

wolfgangOn January 6, 2017, a cold winter’s day in Germany, under clear blue sky with bright sunshine, Wolfgang E. Burhenne’s life ended. He died with his daughter Raphaella, and her family at home, peacefully, in Germany. His family plans a memorial celebration of the life and work of Wolfgang Burhenne in the coming months. The funeral was private, for the family.

Wolfgang Burhenne’s passion for inventing laws to protect all manner of flora and fauna is legendary. More than any other single individual, he conceived and nourished laws for nature conservation and environmental stewardship across the Earth. He was as much at home in the Alps of Austria or Bavaria as he was in East Africa or the Arabian Penisula. He loved la chasse and nourished care for wild animals. At the same time, he devoted his life to building what the world now accepts as sustainable development, helping people and nature to live together in greater harmony. He was as much at home in the hallways of the United Nations in New York or Geneva as he was in parliamentary offices across Germany, as he was in the mountains and forests.

 

In NYC at the German Mission to the UN, Dr. Wolfgang Burhenne's last visit to the UN. Pictured: Dr. Wolfgang Burhenne, Dr. Parvez Hassan, Professor Richard L. Ottinger, Professor Cymie Payne (seated), Professor Nicholas Robinson and David O'Connor, the IUCN Representative to the UN, and the IUCN's Mission staff.

Born April 27, 1924, Wolfgang Burhenne’s formal education ended with the outbreak of the Second World War. He supported resistence to the Nazi regime, and was incarcerated in a prison camp. Following the war, he developed Bavaria’s wildlife and hunting legislation and once the Federal Republic of Germany was established in 1949, he participated in preparing laws in the German Länder through serving Germany’s new Inter-Parliamentary Working Center (IPA) in Bonn. Following establishment of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature in 1948, he became a leader in IUCN at its Second Assembly of State and NGO Members in Brussels. With his IUCN contacts, in 1952 he began his life-long work for the conservation of the European Alps and also for wildlife protection in Germany.

Dr. Wolfgang Burhenne and Dr. Parvez Hassan in NYC, September 2016

In 1956, working from his offices in the Villa Salvaiati, across from the German Chancellery, he founded IUCN’s Environmental Law Centre. At his urging, IUCN had set up a committee on legislation in 1952-53, which became its Commission... Read More...

Colloquium 2017 – Stories of the World We Want and the Law as its Pathway
Tuesday, 17 January 2017

The University of Cebu cordially invites you to the 15th Annual Colloquium of the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law. This event will be held in Cebu City, Philippines, on May 29th-June 2nd, 2017. The topic for the 2016 Colloquium is "Stories of the World We Want and the Law as its Pathway".

Registration information will be available soon.

The University of Cebu and the Organizing Committee are looking forward to welcoming you in Cebu.

Professor Rose-Liza Eisma-Osorio
Chair of the organizing committee

 

Other Events

These events are of general interest and this page will be updated regularly.

Payment form
Thursday, 16 May 2019
 
In memoriam: Associate Professor Anita Rønne, University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Law
Tuesday, 08 January 2019

flower memorialIt is with tremendous sadness that we mourn the death of Associate Professor Anita Rønne who died on 13th December after a short illness.

Anita was employed at the Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen from 1985 and was a highly respected and well liked member of the IUCN Academy. Her expertise in Energy law, Climate Change Law and International Environmental Law meant that her work intersected with the work of many of our members and she was a good friend and colleague to many more.

Anita had many collaborators in Denmark and more widely and participated in numerous international research collaborations on both conferences and publications. She was a prolific researcher including classics such as “Energy Law in Europe – National, EU and International Regulation” of which she was a co-editor.

 

Anita’s innovative approach to environmental law research often led the field. One of her last contributions explores smart technology and regulation. Fortunately, Anita lived to see her co-edited book on this topic "Ret SMART. Om smart teknologi og regulering” (About smart technology and regulation) published in October.

Anita was also an innovative teacher. She was, for example, one of the initiators of Copenhagen’s International Energy Law and Sustainability Masters and also taught on their Climate Change Law Masters.

We remember Anita as a very generous person, always willing to cooperate with others, and encouraging of early career academics. She will be deeply missed by our community.

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2018 Environmental Law Education Awards
Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Distinguished Education Award Senior Faculty

Catherine Iorns Magallanes

Catherine Iorns Magallanes

Catherine Iorns is a Reader in the School of Law at Victoria University of Wellington, Aotearoa New Zealand. She has more than 25 years' experience teaching a range of subjects, including statutory interpretation, indigenous rights, and international law, in addition to a range of environmental law courses. Catherine has focused on pedagogy from the beginning of her career, with presentations and papers on teaching international law, for example, in the 1990s. This has continued today, with her recently undertaking a Higher Education Learning and Teaching course, writing on changing ideas of effective innovations in environmental law teaching.

Catherine is also a well-respected researcher in both indigenous rights and environmental law. Her research achievements include ‘A’ rankings for her written outputs, two writing awards for environmental law papers from the New Zealand Resource Management Law Association, and citations in decisions by the New Zealand EPA. She has recently held external research contracts in relation to precaution and ecosystem-based management, and a current National Science Challenge contract in relation to climate adaptation.

Catherine is also a national Board member of Amnesty International Aotearoa New Zealand, and the Academic Advisor to the New Zealand Council of Legal Education. She is a member of the International Law Association Committee on the Implementation of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, a member of the IUCN World Commission on Environmental Law, and a member of the Bioethics Panel for the New Zealand Biological Heritage National Science Challenge. 

Distinguished Education Award Emerging Faculty

Estair Van Wagner

Estair Van Wagner

Estair Van Wagner is an assistant professor at Osgoode Hall Law School where she is a co-director of the Environmental Justice and Sustainability Clinic. Her research and teaching interests are in the areas of property, land use planning, and natural resource law. Estair has developed a unique place-based approach to legal education, building on her relational approach to research about land use conflicts and people-place relations. She is a member of the organizing committee for Osgoode’s Anishinaabe law camp, developed in partnership with the Chippewas of Nawash First Nation.

Prior to joining Osgoode, Estair was a lecturer at the Victoria University of Wellington Faculty of Law, where... Read More...

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2018 Scholarship Awards
Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Distinguished Scholarship Award, Senior Faculty

Sheila R. Foster

Sheila Foster

Sheila R. Foster is a joint Professor of Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University. Prior to joining Georgetown, she was a University Professor and the Albert A. Walsh Professor of Real Estate, Land Use and Property Law at Fordham University. She also co-directed the Fordham Urban Law Center and was a founder of the Fordham University Urban Consortium. Prior to joining Fordham, she was a Professor of Law at the Rutgers University in Camden, New Jersey.

Professor Foster is the author of numerous publications on environmental law, and is one of the country’s leading scholars on environmental justice. She is co-author of the classic text From the Ground Up: Environmental Racism and the Environmental Justice Movement (NYU Press 2001) (with Luke Cole) and co-editor of The Law of Environmental Justice: Theories and Procedures to Address Disproportionate Risks (American Bar Association 2009) (with Michael Gerrard).    Over the last two decades, she has worked with government agencies, non-government organizations, scholars, and policymakers to reform environmental and land use policies and practices consistent with the principles of environmental justice. Her most recent work explores city growth and governance through the lens of the “commons,” bringing the analytical lens of her environmental law and policy to the city and the management of urban resources. Her latest article, The City as a Commons, is published in the Yale Law and Policy Review (with Christian Iaione) and is the basis of a forthcoming book for MIT Press.

Professor Foster has been involved on many levels with environmental and urban policy. Currently she sits on the New York City Panel on Climate Change (and co-chairs one of its working groups on community-based equitable adaptation), is chair of the advisory committee of the Global Parliament of Mayors, and an advisory board member of the Marron Institute for Urban Management at NYU.

Distinguished Scholarship Award, Emerging Faculty

Saiful Karim

Saiful Karim

Associate Professor (Dr) Saiful Karim is the Director (International) of the School of Law at the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, Australia. Dr Karim has held Visiting Faculty position at Sydney University and a consultant at the University of the South Pacific and a visiting research fellow at the National University of Singapore. Dr. Karim has published extensively in the fields of public international law and environmental law and has presented research papers in many conferences and workshops organised by various academic... Read More...

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2017 Scholarship Awards
Wednesday, 27 September 2017

2017 Senior Scholarship Award

Jonathan Verschuuren

Professor of International and European Environmental Law - Tilburg Sustainability Center and Tilburg Law School
Extraordinary professor North West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa
Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellow - Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law, University of Sydney

Jonathan is a long time member of the IUCN World Commission for Environmental Law and contributor to the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law. He is currently a professor of International and European Environmental law at Tilburg Law School, Netherlands and has served as a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellow at the Australian Centre for Climate and the Environment, University of Sydney and an Extraordinary professor North West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.

Over the past 25 years, Jonathan has published more than 250 academic publications in the field of environmental law. His research comprises almost all sectors of environmental policy such as air, water, soil, waste, and biodiversity, as well as more general topics such as corporate social responsibility, the precautionary principle, transboundary cooperation, and environmental justice. He has led international book projects involving a variety of international authors, for instance: International Governance and Law. State Regulation and Non-State Law (Edward Elgar: 2008) and The Impact of Legislation. A Critical Analysis of Ex Ante Evaluation (Martinus Nijhoff/Brill: 2009).

Jonathan’s work also includes collaboration in several international research programmes, such as programme in which a South African-Dutch team of legal scholars intensively worked together on environmental governance issues in southern Africa (2005-2008); and an EU funded programme of a group of, mostly economists, from various European research institutes on the combined impact of climate change instruments, such as emissions trading and carbon taxes (2012-2015).  In 2015, Jonathan received a prestigious Marie Skolodowska Curie fellowship under the EU’s Horizon 2020 research program for a two year project aimed at developing a regulatory framework to stimulate farmers to convert to climate smart agriculture. Some of his recent publications on this topic include: J. Verschuuren, Towards a Regulatory Design for Reducing Emissions from... Read More...

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2017 Environmental Law Education Awards
Wednesday, 27 September 2017

Senior teaching award

PROFESSOR DONNA CRAIG

Donna Craig is a specialist in international, comparative and national environmental law and policy at Western Sydney University. She was one of the earliest academics to specialise in environmental law (from 1976) and has researched and taught across a wide range of environmental law areas and jurisdictions. In particular, she was a pioneer in the development of curricula and teaching in Comparative Environmental Law (focusing on the Asia and Pacific Regions), International Environmental Law, Sustainable Development Law, Corporate Environmental Law, Australian Environmental and Planning Law and Comparative Indigenous Governance Regimes. She has also made significant research and teaching contributions in aspects of Biodiversity Law (relating to recognition of knowledge and practices of Indigenous and local communities, intellectual and cultural property rights, recognition of customary laws and community based environmental management), participatory approaches to environmental decision-making, environmental impact assessment and social impact assessment.

Donna also held a Research Chair as Professor of Desert Knowledge, Charles Darwin University. She has over 40 years experience in environmental law research, legal practice, teaching and working with communities, NGO’s, environmental organisations, governments and corporations. Her research and publications emphasize the social, cultural and human rights dimensions of legislation, programs, impact assessment and sustainable development. Her climate change and water law research includes climate adaptation, resource management, capacity building and Indigenous cultural values. She also works with Indigenous and local communities developing natural resource based livelihoods and advising on national and international legal regimes. Donna served as Foundation Board Member of the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law, Regional Vice-Chair for Oceania of the IUCN Commission of Environmental Law, Regional Governor of the International Council on Environmental Law, Board Member of the Northern Territory Environmental Protection Authority and Member of Advisory Board of Greenland-based International Training Centre of Indigenous Peoples. She is currently Deputy Director of the International Centre for Ocean Governance (ICOG) at the University of Western Sydney delivering capacity building training for the Bangladesh judiciary (2017-2020).

 
Environmental Protection and Human Rights: When Friends become Foes – Conflict Management of the CJEU
Tuesday, 13 June 2017

While environmental protection and human rights are traditionally conceptualized in a synergistic fashion, the paper unveils through a series of cases how these two legitimate goals can enter into collision and, most importantly, which adjudicative topoi the CJEU employs to address these normative conflicts. The paper demonstrates how Luxembourg’s judges have developed specific hermeneutics that stand far from formal techniques of interpretation. In exploring the CJEU’s solipsistic character, its subtle process of semantic law-making embedded in its recourse to the ever-expanding ‘general interest’ to environmental protection, and its reliance on a managerial vernacular of expertise, the analysis not only elucidates changing patterns of fundamental rights adjudication but also comments on the increasingly complex legal encounter between human rights and environmental protection.


Marie-Catherine Petersmann presentation at 2016 Oslo Colloquium

Marie-Catherine Petersmann

Marie-Catherine Petersmann is a third year PhD researcher in International Law at the European University Institute (EUI) in Florence, Italy. Her research focuses on the conflicting relationship between environmental protection and human rights. More specifically, she investigates how international human rights adjudicators manage specific conflicts of norms – when environmental protection legislations negatively impact human rights – and how they reconcile these two legitimate yet sometimes colliding legal obligations. Before beginning her academic career, Marie worked for the UNHCR and for the FIDH in Geneva. Marie’s LinkedIn profile can be found here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marie-catherine-petersmann-bb9517128/

 
A Very Special Tribute to Judge Christopher Gregory Weeramantry
Wednesday, 01 March 2017

The IUCN Academy of Environmental Law announces with profound sadness the passing of Judge Christopher Gregory Weeramantry, Fellow of the IUCN Academy.

Judge Weeramantry passed away peacefully on January 5, 2017 at the age of 90 in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Following is a special tribute to Judge Weeramantry written by his former assistant, Dr. Nilupul Gunawardena Somathilaka from the Hague, The Netherlands.

Christopher Gregory Weeramantry

(1926-2017)

Each and every nation treasures a selected band of very special sons and daughters; the eminently gifted ones in any given domain of human endeavour. Christopher Gregory Weeramantry will certainly go down in history as one of the greatest sons of Sri Lanka and as a Global Citizen of the highest order.

The surname Weeramantry is spoken of with respect throughout the country: Judge Christopher Weeramantry’s father Gregory and his elder brother Lucian earned their spurs in national history, but Christopher was to reach well beyond the national compound. He made his name, and that of his beloved Sri Lanka echo worldwide. None perhaps of the eminent legal and social minds, Sri Lanka gave birth to, ever exerted such an impact on global thought as he did. For there was a personal element to it as well. By virtue of his gentle, mild personality, his irresistible charm - topped by that enchanting smile – Christopher Weeramantry, with enviable ease, laced together strings of friends and admirers worldwide.

 

Judge Weeramantry - as he was known, was gifted with a rare legal and philosophical genius, a photographic memory, an astoundable energy and a formidable drive and will-power. For all of this, he will be remembered first and foremost for his courageous stand on principle when it counted most, when he was faced with one of the greatest challenges met in the history of the International Court of Justice in The Hague, which he served with such pride and honour (1991-2000). His valiant defence, in the trenches of the law, of the unconditional ban on Nuclear Weapons will be remembered as the zenith of his moral endeavours.

Some people manage to rise to the occasion: with Judge Weeramantry, one felt he was hand-picked and groomed all his life to serve the world. Rarely, even in the impressive, century-old records of the highest judicial authority the modern world boasts as the outcome of a chequered process and at the end of a long and winding road, will one find a Judge whose in-depth humanity, truly universal outlook and inter-cultural learning shone so eminently and persuasively.

His stand in The Hague did not come by incident, though. At various critical moments in his long career Weeramantry spoke up on principle on acute political and ethical issues, be this in an... Read More...

IN MEMORIAM - Dr. Wolfgang E. Burhenne
Tuesday, 17 January 2017

By: Professor Nick Robinson

wolfgangOn January 6, 2017, a cold winter’s day in Germany, under clear blue sky with bright sunshine, Wolfgang E. Burhenne’s life ended. He died with his daughter Raphaella, and her family at home, peacefully, in Germany. His family plans a memorial celebration of the life and work of Wolfgang Burhenne in the coming months. The funeral was private, for the family.

Wolfgang Burhenne’s passion for inventing laws to protect all manner of flora and fauna is legendary. More than any other single individual, he conceived and nourished laws for nature conservation and environmental stewardship across the Earth. He was as much at home in the Alps of Austria or Bavaria as he was in East Africa or the Arabian Penisula. He loved la chasse and nourished care for wild animals. At the same time, he devoted his life to building what the world now accepts as sustainable development, helping people and nature to live together in greater harmony. He was as much at home in the hallways of the United Nations in New York or Geneva as he was in parliamentary offices across Germany, as he was in the mountains and forests.

 

In NYC at the German Mission to the UN, Dr. Wolfgang Burhenne's last visit to the UN. Pictured: Dr. Wolfgang Burhenne, Dr. Parvez Hassan, Professor Richard L. Ottinger, Professor Cymie Payne (seated), Professor Nicholas Robinson and David O'Connor, the IUCN Representative to the UN, and the IUCN's Mission staff.

Born April 27, 1924, Wolfgang Burhenne’s formal education ended with the outbreak of the Second World War. He supported resistence to the Nazi regime, and was incarcerated in a prison camp. Following the war, he developed Bavaria’s wildlife and hunting legislation and once the Federal Republic of Germany was established in 1949, he participated in preparing laws in the German Länder through serving Germany’s new Inter-Parliamentary Working Center (IPA) in Bonn. Following establishment of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature in 1948, he became a leader in IUCN at its Second Assembly of State and NGO Members in Brussels. With his IUCN contacts, in 1952 he began his life-long work for the conservation of the European Alps and also for wildlife protection in Germany.

Dr. Wolfgang Burhenne and Dr. Parvez Hassan in NYC, September 2016

In 1956, working from his offices in the Villa Salvaiati, across from the German Chancellery, he founded IUCN’s Environmental Law Centre. At his urging, IUCN had set up a committee on legislation in 1952-53, which became its Commission... Read More...

Colloquium 2017 – Stories of the World We Want and the Law as its Pathway
Tuesday, 17 January 2017

The University of Cebu cordially invites you to the 15th Annual Colloquium of the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law. This event will be held in Cebu City, Philippines, on May 29th-June 2nd, 2017. The topic for the 2016 Colloquium is "Stories of the World We Want and the Law as its Pathway".

Registration information will be available soon.

The University of Cebu and the Organizing Committee are looking forward to welcoming you in Cebu.

Professor Rose-Liza Eisma-Osorio
Chair of the organizing committee

 

Events Archive

This page provides a listing of past events of the IUCN Academy

Member news: Louis Kotze has a new book
Wednesday, 26 October 2016

Louis Kotze has a new book: 'Global Environmental Constitutionalism in the Anthropocene'. If you are interested in a copy, please contact Emma Platt, Hart Publishing, for a discount at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and let her know you are an Academy member.

 

 
Environmental Protection and Human Rights: When Friends become Foes – Conflict Management of the CJEU
Tuesday, 13 June 2017

While environmental protection and human rights are traditionally conceptualized in a synergistic fashion, the paper unveils through a series of cases how these two legitimate goals can enter into collision and, most importantly, which adjudicative topoi the CJEU employs to address these normative conflicts. The paper demonstrates how Luxembourg’s judges have developed specific hermeneutics that stand far from formal techniques of interpretation. In exploring the CJEU’s solipsistic character, its subtle process of semantic law-making embedded in its recourse to the ever-expanding ‘general interest’ to environmental protection, and its reliance on a managerial vernacular of expertise, the analysis not only elucidates changing patterns of fundamental rights adjudication but also comments on the increasingly complex legal encounter between human rights and environmental protection.


Marie-Catherine Petersmann presentation at 2016 Oslo Colloquium

Marie-Catherine Petersmann

Marie-Catherine Petersmann is a third year PhD researcher in International Law at the European University Institute (EUI) in Florence, Italy. Her research focuses on the conflicting relationship between environmental protection and human rights. More specifically, she investigates how international human rights adjudicators manage specific conflicts of norms – when environmental protection legislations negatively impact human rights – and how they reconcile these two legitimate yet sometimes colliding legal obligations. Before beginning her academic career, Marie worked for the UNHCR and for the FIDH in Geneva. Marie’s LinkedIn profile can be found here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/marie-catherine-petersmann-bb9517128/

 
IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2018 Scholarship Awards
Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Distinguished Scholarship Award, Senior Faculty

Sheila R. Foster

Sheila Foster

Sheila R. Foster is a joint Professor of Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University. Prior to joining Georgetown, she was a University Professor and the Albert A. Walsh Professor of Real Estate, Land Use and Property Law at Fordham University. She also co-directed the Fordham Urban Law Center and was a founder of the Fordham University Urban Consortium. Prior to joining Fordham, she was a Professor of Law at the Rutgers University in Camden, New Jersey.

Professor Foster is the author of numerous publications on environmental law, and is one of the country’s leading scholars on environmental justice. She is co-author of the classic text From the Ground Up: Environmental Racism and the Environmental Justice Movement (NYU Press 2001) (with Luke Cole) and co-editor of The Law of Environmental Justice: Theories and Procedures to Address Disproportionate Risks (American Bar Association 2009) (with Michael Gerrard).    Over the last two decades, she has worked with government agencies, non-government organizations, scholars, and policymakers to reform environmental and land use policies and practices consistent with the principles of environmental justice. Her most recent work explores city growth and governance through the lens of the “commons,” bringing the analytical lens of her environmental law and policy to the city and the management of urban resources. Her latest article, The City as a Commons, is published in the Yale Law and Policy Review (with Christian Iaione) and is the basis of a forthcoming book for MIT Press.

Professor Foster has been involved on many levels with environmental and urban policy. Currently she sits on the New York City Panel on Climate Change (and co-chairs one of its working groups on community-based equitable adaptation), is chair of the advisory committee of the Global Parliament of Mayors, and an advisory board member of the Marron Institute for Urban Management at NYU.

Distinguished Scholarship Award, Emerging Faculty

Saiful Karim

Saiful Karim

Associate Professor (Dr) Saiful Karim is the Director (International) of the School of Law at the Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, Australia. Dr Karim has held Visiting Faculty position at Sydney University and a consultant at the University of the South Pacific and a visiting research fellow at the National University of Singapore. Dr. Karim has published extensively in the fields of public international law and environmental law and has presented research papers in many conferences and workshops organised by various academic... Read More...

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2018 Environmental Law Education Awards
Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Distinguished Education Award Senior Faculty

Catherine Iorns Magallanes

Catherine Iorns Magallanes

Catherine Iorns is a Reader in the School of Law at Victoria University of Wellington, Aotearoa New Zealand. She has more than 25 years' experience teaching a range of subjects, including statutory interpretation, indigenous rights, and international law, in addition to a range of environmental law courses. Catherine has focused on pedagogy from the beginning of her career, with presentations and papers on teaching international law, for example, in the 1990s. This has continued today, with her recently undertaking a Higher Education Learning and Teaching course, writing on changing ideas of effective innovations in environmental law teaching.

Catherine is also a well-respected researcher in both indigenous rights and environmental law. Her research achievements include ‘A’ rankings for her written outputs, two writing awards for environmental law papers from the New Zealand Resource Management Law Association, and citations in decisions by the New Zealand EPA. She has recently held external research contracts in relation to precaution and ecosystem-based management, and a current National Science Challenge contract in relation to climate adaptation.

Catherine is also a national Board member of Amnesty International Aotearoa New Zealand, and the Academic Advisor to the New Zealand Council of Legal Education. She is a member of the International Law Association Committee on the Implementation of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, a member of the IUCN World Commission on Environmental Law, and a member of the Bioethics Panel for the New Zealand Biological Heritage National Science Challenge. 

Distinguished Education Award Emerging Faculty

Estair Van Wagner

Estair Van Wagner

Estair Van Wagner is an assistant professor at Osgoode Hall Law School where she is a co-director of the Environmental Justice and Sustainability Clinic. Her research and teaching interests are in the areas of property, land use planning, and natural resource law. Estair has developed a unique place-based approach to legal education, building on her relational approach to research about land use conflicts and people-place relations. She is a member of the organizing committee for Osgoode’s Anishinaabe law camp, developed in partnership with the Chippewas of Nawash First Nation.

Prior to joining Osgoode, Estair was a lecturer at the Victoria University of Wellington Faculty of Law, where... Read More...

In memoriam: Associate Professor Anita Rønne, University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Law
Tuesday, 08 January 2019

flower memorialIt is with tremendous sadness that we mourn the death of Associate Professor Anita Rønne who died on 13th December after a short illness.

Anita was employed at the Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen from 1985 and was a highly respected and well liked member of the IUCN Academy. Her expertise in Energy law, Climate Change Law and International Environmental Law meant that her work intersected with the work of many of our members and she was a good friend and colleague to many more.

Anita had many collaborators in Denmark and more widely and participated in numerous international research collaborations on both conferences and publications. She was a prolific researcher including classics such as “Energy Law in Europe – National, EU and International Regulation” of which she was a co-editor.

 

Anita’s innovative approach to environmental law research often led the field. One of her last contributions explores smart technology and regulation. Fortunately, Anita lived to see her co-edited book on this topic "Ret SMART. Om smart teknologi og regulering” (About smart technology and regulation) published in October.

Anita was also an innovative teacher. She was, for example, one of the initiators of Copenhagen’s International Energy Law and Sustainability Masters and also taught on their Climate Change Law Masters.

We remember Anita as a very generous person, always willing to cooperate with others, and encouraging of early career academics. She will be deeply missed by our community.

Payment form
Thursday, 16 May 2019
 
13th Colloquium
Wednesday, 02 December 2015

Amber Prasad Pant- Climate Change and Forest Management in Nepal

Andri Wibisana- Law Enforcement for Forest Fires in Indonesia: Critical Comments

Carina Costa de Oliveira- The limits of international environmental law related to the protection of marine resources in the context of the seabed exploration and exploitation

Dhany Rahmawan- Public Participation in Indonesia Environmental Management

Dhiana Puspitawati Rachmad Safa'at- Legal Framework on Marine Biodiversity in Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction

Haifeng Deng- Public Participation in Energy Area of China

Ida Nurlinda- The Policy of Sustainable Protection and Management for Primary Natural Forest and Peat Ecosystem in order to Refining Forestry Governance in Indonesia

Idowu Adegbite- Clinical Legal Education in Nigeria

Indrani Sarma- Democratic Forest Governance in India and the Forest Rights Act

Laely Nurhidayah- Conservation and Sustainable Use of Marine Biodiversity in Indonesia: Opportunities and Challenges

Marcia Fajardo- Biodiversity vs Agriculture- Enemies or Allies? The agroforestry case within the Brazilian legal framework

Mas Achmad Santosa- Preventing and Combating Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Indonesia

Mekete Bekele Tekle- Climate-Resilient Green Economy: Ethiopia's Strategy for Sustainable Development

Nawaporn Saeneewong- Regional cooperation under the rights and/or obligations to establish marine protected areas in the international conventions

Rachmad Safaat- Paradigm Reconstruction of Forest Management System Based on Ecological Sustainability

Satya Tripathi- Climate Change in Indonesia and its impact upon Biodiversity

Siradj Okta- ASEAN Economic Community: Amplification of Ecocide?

Solange Teles de Silva & team- Marine Protected Areas in Brazil and the Effectiveness of the Participation Principle

Svitlana Romanko- The Biodiversity Policy and the Forest Law of Ukraine: the Road to Where?

Yilin Pei- Read More...

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2015 Environmental Law Education Awards
Thursday, 11 February 2016

The IUCN Academy of Environmental Law Education Awards recognize significant and diverse contributions to education and learning on environmental law by Senior and Emerging faculty. Such contributions include teaching specialized courses to undergraduate and graduate students, delivering clinical programs that expose students to the practice of environmental law, and supervising students who are undertaking advanced research in Masters and PhD programs.

The 2015 Education Award winners are announced below.

Senior Education Award : Professor Charles Okidi


Professor Charles Okidi

Professor Charles Okidi is associated with the School of Law and the Centre for Advanced Studies in Environmental Law and Policy at the University of Nairobi, Kenya.  The following commentary is taken from the remarks of Professor Sophie Riley, Chair of the Academy’s Teaching and Awards Committee, in announcing the award.

“Professor Charles Okidi is of course well known amongst our colleagues of the Academy as the father of environmental law in Africa. In this sense, he requires no further introduction and anything I am about to say is superfluous. However, let us reflect on some of Professor Okidi’s amazing achievements.

To start with he taught environmental law at the University of Nairobi in the 1980’s, long before the subject was taught elsewhere. Professor Okidi has supervised many graduate students and mentored students in publishing their work. He uses a multi-disciplinary approach to teaching and this is reflected in the fact that Professor Okidi’s students have gone on to work for organisations such as UNEP, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. In addition many of his students have become researchers and academics at a range of universities.

Professor Okidi is also one of the founding members of the International Commission on Environmental Law as well as a founding member of the IUCN Academy on Environmental Law. In these positions Professor Okidi has forged linkages with leading academics around the world.

More recently Professor Okidi founded the Centre for Advanced Study of Environmental Law and Policy at the University of Nairobi. This centre offers graduate programmes in environmental law, policy and diplomacy. Professor Okidi was also a driving force behind the establishment of the Association of Environmental Law Teachers in African Universities.

Professor Okidi has published in the vicinity of 40 books and monographs, 28 journal articles and book chapters. He has also co-authored the first environmental law text book in Kenya.

In short, professor Okidi has been instrumental in setting the environmental agenda in Kenya and... Read More...

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law 2015 Scholarship Awards
Thursday, 11 February 2016

The IUCN Academy of Environmental Law Scholarship Awards for Senior and Emerging scholars recognize publications including academic books (edited or authored), journal articles and book chapters, as well as commissioned policy reports and studies of research value in any language. Consideration may also be given to other scholarly activities, such as organizing academic conferences and workshops, building collaborative research networks, and other innovations that advance research in environmental law.

The 2015 Scholarship Award winners are announced below.

Senior Scholarship Award: Professor Ben Boer

Professor Ben Boer is Emeritus Professor in the Faculty of Law of the University of Sydney (Australia) and Distinguished Professor at Wuhan University Law School in its Research Institute of Environmental Law (China).


Professor Ben Boer and Professor Nilufer Oral, Chair, IUCN Academy of Environmental Law

The following excerpts regarding the academic work of Professor Boer are taken from the reviewers:

Prodigious scholarly efforts.  A pioneer. Internationally recognized expert.  His scholarly work has been characterized by extraordinary transnational as well as international scope, careful attention to detail and exposition in describing issues and existing law accompanied by sensible, original, and sometimes bold legislative, policy and governance proposals”.

A distinguished academic career spanning over more than four decades at a number of prestigious universities and international organizations – his high-quality original scholarship – wide range of subject areas including international environmental law, comparative environmental law, conservation and heritage law, water law, environmental rights, protection of soils and the law related to protected areas and biodiversity – highest academic standards with a considerable degree of originality and great accessibility appealing to a wide readership well beyond environmental law“.

Emerging Scholarship Award: Professor Sara Seck

Professor Sara Seck is Associate Professor with the Faculty of Law, University of Western Ontario, Canada.


Professor Sara Seck

The following excerpts regarding the academic work of Professor Seck are taken from the reviewers:

“Significant body of work.  Wide array of issues related to the governance of transnational corporate activity, human rights and the environment.  Original insights into the way the extractive industry has helped to shape environmental discourse on resource extraction and sustainable... Read More...

IUCN Academy of Environmental Law: 2015 Best Graduate Student Paper Award
Thursday, 11 February 2016

The IUCN Academy of Environmental Law is pleased to announce that Marcia Fajardo Cavalcanti de Albuquerque (who is a student at both Paris Pantheon-Sorbonne, France, and Mackenzie University of Sao Paolo, Brazil) and Dignité Bwiza (who is a student at the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa) are the winners of the 2015 Best Graduate Student Paper Award.  Congratulations.

Márcia Fajardo Cavalcanti de Albuquerque

The title of Marcia’s paper is “Biodiversity vs Agriculture – Friends or Foes?  The Agroforestry Case within the Brazilian Legal Framework.”   Her paper argues that agriculture and biodiversity can be allies through the adoption of agroforestry practices. She illustrates her argument through a Brazilian case study, and discusses the reforms necessary to create a supportive regulatory framework.


Winnie Carruth & Marcia Fajardo Cavalcanti de Albuquerque

Dignité Bwiza

The title of Dignite’s paper is “Attaining Sustainable Forest Management in Post-Conflict Societies: How the Principles of Adaptive Law and Resilience can Strengthen Forest Law Enforcement.”  Her paper examines forest management in the Democratic Republic of Congo and uses legal and non-legal materials as well as structured interviews with a variety of stakeholders to develop recommendations for protecting forests in post-conflict societies.


Dignité Bwiza

Edward Elgar Publishing kindly donated two books to each of Marcia and Dignité to mark the occasion.  The IUCN Academy thanks Edward Elgar for its generosity and continuing support of the Academy.